Tag Archives: apples

Apple flow

The apples are superabundant this year.  Far more than last year.

“They say” that a good apple year means a hard winter.  We shall see.  It seemed true in 2014.Tree #5 has huge fruits on it that would rival any store bought Honeycrisp.  So would the taste.  Delicious.

Tree #23

These trees, while some have been released or had a little pruning, are for the most part still as wild as when we got here.  Overgrown, diseased, crowded.  Poor things.  There’s too many.  They don’t get plenty of attention.   This tree, #47, is glorious!  Huge, I can’t even get it all in a picture.  The trunk has a mean lean and it looks like it’s nearly dead, but every year, it’s a wonder.  Despite a 45˚ list it’s still tall, and crazy heavy with apples. It also has large fruit. I like this little tree.  Not so little, but it has little pink-yellow fruit and in the two summers since it got released it has been rejuvenating itself.  New low branches, and the fruit is coming in thicker and larger.  I also don’t know what any of these heritage apples are.  I get conflicting IDs.

The pigs are the chief beneficiaries of these riches.  They get a bucket of windfalls every day.  And the birds, and chickens,  and squirrels, and chipmunks, and wasps.  I have too much applesauce left over, so I’m not canning it this year, but hopefully, there will be cider:)

Sunbathing and pig lunch

It´s a nice hot day, so the chickens decided to flake out in the path.These are the Famous Five, the house moochers.  They just kind of tip over like beached boats, and stick out a wing.

Even Jean Jacket‘s in there.

Or they´ll find some shade where they can get it.

Even a Brahma is lounging.I wanted to not get these pigs stuck on a 3x/day feeding schedule so it was possible to leave for the day, so they get their piggy rations morning and night, but to tide them over, they also get a 5 gal bucket of apples every day, or whatever fruit/scraps/vegetables (It’s a good time of year to be a pig).

Usually, there are several apples left over come supper time.  If there are no apples, then I know they had a big day, and they’re legitimately hungry for dinner.Today they got turnips and kale too, and happily, they loved the kale, eating it first.  I wasn’t sure after the cucumbers. They stand on it to rip a piece off with their mouths, like they’ve done it before.

These pigs have the craziest eyebrows! They’re wild Grandpa Wizard eyebrows, like visors.

So cute!

 

Gatekeeper

We have a gate on our driveway.  Our driveway passes right through the ancient orchard, and apples drop all over the roadway.  One big branch arches over the road laden with lots of apples, but tiny ones- small because of the drought.

We drive through the gate almost every day.  Almost every day these days, the gate is decorated.20160913_085943

There’s a chipmunk that thinks the gate is the best snack spot ever, and he leaves multiple partially chewed apples balancing on the edge of the boards that make the swinging gate, or on top of the post that anchors it.

Even funnier, there will be an apple with some chews, then later less of the same apple, still later mostly an apple core, balanced in the same spot.

Sometimes, we even drive up and see the chipmunk hugging his apple on his perch.  Eeep!  He leaves his apple behind, rocking like a nicked bowling pin,  and darts away, tail straight up.

Other chipmunks in our life

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The apple flow is on

Every day, the first apple tree is dropping five gallons of apples.  Dropping.  That’s a fraction of how many are staying on the tree.

About half of them are split, and go to the pigs and hens.  When I pick them up, wasps come tumbling out of the splits.  I think they might get drunk on the spoiled apples.  The wasps are luxuriating in the apple glut.  Pretty soon, the pigs are gonna give me the Another apple? face too.  The undamaged ones, I’m saucing, since this is a lovely sauce apple.

This is one of the dozen or so trees HW pruned in the spring, and this tree has responded exuberantly.  Many of the apples are “store-sized” already (would expect a couple years pruning to come up to full size).

This is just the first tree to get ripe, of….63?

Haha.  There are, at last count, 63 apple trees here, but only about a third of them look likely to bear apples, and most of them haven’t been pruned, so they have tight little stingy apples.  If all goes well, we will have a fine amount of cider this year.  Over time and annual pruning, more of these legacy apple trees will come back into production.

It’s Apple Time!

The apples are coming!  One of the big, old, stately ancient apple trees (when we come up with the perfect name for these wizened empresses of apple trees, it will become the name of our farm) by the old farmhouse is loaded with fruit, weighing the branches down to the ground.  I picked up about 5 gallons of apples just off the ground, lobbing many of them directly into the pig compound.  Oink, oink.  Happy pigs.

Now everybody has apples…

The chickens get excited about apples early in the season. Later they’ll be, What’s that? Another apple?

SAMSUNG

Time for the dog to get his apple a day in his dog’s breakfast. He prefers them sliced, but he’ll give them a gnaw, too.

Tree tagging

2015-06-21 15.50.19I numbered all the fruit trees, and tagged them all with numbers I cut out of yogourt tubs and lids.

This is so that I can keep notes about health, pruning, fruit, etc, variety!  when we figure out what the heck any of them are… and generally talk about them with better reference points than “that tree that used to have the hawthorn beside it but we cut it down”.

“You mean the one by the big rock?”

“No, closer to the well.”

“Oh, by the trail, where the rhubarb is.”

“No on the other side.”

This can take a while.

It turns out we have more than 60 fruit trees, so the above scenario for describing them is not very practical.  Numbers are a good idea.

All are in various ages, stages, and health, but there are far fewer seedlings among the total than I expected.  Half a dozen at most.  Most are in “dire emergency” and need release, pruning, and more.

But some are big, majestic beauties that have been quietly living away and making apples without us here, and will go right on doing so.

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